All about vintage cast iron cookware and the people who use it. Education, identification, use, stories, collectors and collections.

Recent Posts

Nancy Addison’s “Mash in the Hole” Meatloaf, Made in her Lodge Legacy Cast Iron Bundt Cake Pan

Nancy Addison’s “Mash in the Hole” Meatloaf, Made in her Lodge Legacy Cast Iron Bundt Cake Pan

You already know that I like to check out the “Black Iron Master” contest on Sundays on the Facebook page Black Iron Cooking, Antiques, and Humor. I’ve previously posted about some of Doyle Pregler and Brenda Bernstein’s  entries, and Rose Waddell’s winning Mahogany Chiffon Hydrangea cake made in […]

Rose Waddell’s Prize-Winning Mahogany Chiffon Hydrangea Cake made in a Lodge Legacy Cast Iron Fluted Cake Pan

Rose Waddell’s Prize-Winning Mahogany Chiffon Hydrangea Cake made in a Lodge Legacy Cast Iron Fluted Cake Pan

I’ve mentioned before that I enjoy following the “Black Iron Master” contest each Sunday on the Facebook page Black Iron Cooking, Antiques, and Humor. Doyle Pregler and Brenda Bernstein often enter the contest – Brenda with her beautiful cakes and Doyle with his delectable meals. Members of […]

Rustic Cabin Sirloin Steak Made in a Rustic BSR Cast Iron Skillet

Rustic Cabin Sirloin Steak Made in a Rustic BSR Cast Iron Skillet

I recently went up to the southern shore of Lake Superior in Wisconsin to visit with my friends Louise and Tom, who keep their 35’ sailboat at Siskiwit Bay Marina in Cornucopia. I’ve come to visit and tent camp alongside their slip many, many times […]

My Favorite Pan…At Least For Today!

My Favorite Pan…At Least For Today!

The editor of the GCICA quarterly newsletter – the “Griswold & Cast Iron Quarterly” – is planning to feature members and their favorite pans in future editions. We talked at the 2018 Convention in Baton Rouge, and I offered to submit a little blurb to […]

The Great Soap Debate

The Great Soap Debate

“In a properly seasoned cast iron pan, one that has been rubbed with oil and heated repeatedly, the oil has already broken down into a plastic-like substance that has bonded to the surface of the metal. This is what gives well-seasoned cast iron its non-stick properties, and as the material is no longer actually an oil, the surfactants in dish soap should not affect it. Go ahead and soap it up and scrub it out.” J. KENJI LÓPEZ-ALT, author of “The Food Lab”


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